Poetry Thursday – Week 1

 

Poetry Thursday was a couple of days ago and like Affirmation Tuesday, this will also be a weekly sharing event.  Basic RGB

This week will be about Anaïs Nin…

Anaïs Nin was a writer of novels, short stories, and erotica.  Anaïs Nin (Spanish: [anaˈis ˈnin]; born Angela Anaïs Juana Antolina Rosa Edelmira Nin y Culmell; February 21, 1903 – January 14, 1977) was an essayist and memoirist born to Cuban parents in France, where she was also raised.  She wrote journals (which span more than 60 years, beginning when she was 11 years old and ending shortly before her death), novels, critical studies, essays, short stories, and erotica. A great deal of her work, including Delta of Venus and Little Birds, was published posthumously.

 

List of works

 

  • Waste of Timelessness: And Other Early Stories (written before 1932, published posthumously)
  • D. H. Lawrence: An Unprofessional Study (1932)
  • House of Incest (1936)
  • Winter of Artifice (1939)
  • Under a Glass Bell (1944)
  • Cities of the Interior (1959), in five volumes:
  • Ladders to Fire
  • Children of the Albatross
  • The Four-Chambered Heart
  • A Spy in the House of Love
  • Seduction of the Minotaur, originally published as Solar Barque (1958).
  • Delta of Venus (1977)
  • Little Birds (1979)
  • Collages (1964)
  • The Early Diary of Anaïs Nin (1931–1947), in four volumes
  • The Diary of Anaïs Nin, in seven volumes, edited by herself
  • The Novel of the Future (1968)
  • In Favor of the Sensitive Man (1976)
  • The Restless Spirit: Journal of a Gemini by Barbara Kraft (1976), with preface by Anaïs Nin
  • A Literate Passion: Letters of Anaïs Nin & Henry Miller (1987)
  • Henry and June: From A Journal of Love. The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin (1931–1932) (1986), edited by Rupert Pole after her death
  • Incest: From a Journal of Love (1992)
  • Fire: From A Journal of Love (1995)
  • Nearer the Moon: From A Journal of Love (1996)
  • Aphrodisiac: Erotic Drawingsby John Boyce for Selected Passages from the Works of Anaïs Nin
  • Mirages: The Unexpurgated Diary of Anaïs Nin 1939-1947 (2013)
  • Auletris (2016)

 

I  didn’t delve too deep into her history but the snippets I read were very interesting.  It really is worth reading more.

I selected a few of her quotes that spoke to me:

“Throw your dreams into space like a kite, and you do not know what it will bring back: a new life, a new friend,  a new love,  a new country”

“You don’t find love, it finds you.  It’s got a little bit to do with destiny,  fate and what’s written in the stars”

“I want to do things so wild with you that I don’t know how to say them”

“We don’t see things as they are, we see them as we are”

“Things I forgot to tell you […] That I love you,  and that when I awake in the morning I use my intelligence to discover more ways of appreciating you. [..] That I love you.  That I love you.  That I love you.”

“I had a feeling that Pandora’s box contained the mysteries of women’s sensuality,  so different from a man’s and for which man’s language was so inadequate.. The language of sex had yet to be invented. .The language of the senses was yet to be explored.”

“We write to taste life twice, in the moment and in retrospect”

“Eroticism is one of the basic means of self-knowledge,  as indispensable as poetry.”

 

If one of them speaks to you explore more…I am sure you will find so much more like the one that spoke to you and so much more.

 

Let’s see what this week’s Poetry Thursday will bring.

 

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaïs_Nin

 

Happy Reading,

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